nmo-gut-health-journal

Changing your Gut Microbiome could be the Key to Weight Loss

November 12, 2017 Kriben Govender

The lead up to summer is inevitably the time of year when I am most conscious about the excesses accumulated during the cooler months. I have been exploring the impact of glycemic response and insulin spikes which is widely believed to send the body into a fat accumulation frenzy.  Why is it that some people eat a tiny sliver cake with a resulting 10 on the insulin richter scale whilst that best friend can eat the whole wedding cake without as much a a blip. What scientists are discovering is that differences in genetics and more importantly gut microbiome composition dramatically impacts these insulin spikes and resulting weight gain. Check out the ground breaking research happening at the Weizmann Institute in Israel.

What's important to note is that we can't change our genetics but we can change our microbiome significantly in a short period of time and it is our belief that this will pave the way for highly personalised diets based a person's microbiome composition.

Get your microbiome analysed at Allele Microbiome, Australia's first direct to consumer test kits GUT EXPLORER TM available here

 

 

Once the microbiome is analysed it is possible to provide dietary interventions to shape the microbiome in a favourable way. The most relevant test groups in regards to glycemic response (insulin produced in response blood glucose) of foods are type 2 diabetics. A study by Swedish researchers Brunkwall et al (2017)  titled "The gut microbiome as a target for prevention and treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes: from current human evidence to future possibilities" maps out the current status quo in this area. 

In our previous article  "Eating Kefir Grains could flatten your tummy" research was presented on how Kefir could facilitate weight loss by enhancing a species of bacteria Akkermansia inversely associated with obesity and diabetes. Further supporting studies by Iranian researchers Otsadrahimi et al (2015): "Effect of probiotic fermented milk (kefir) on glycemic control and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial" found that 600 ml of kefir per day significantly reduced serum levels of glucose and could be useful as a complementary or adjuvant therapy in the treatment of diabetes.

Whilst further studies are required to validate it is a fair assumption that the probiotics and the metabolites produced in kefir could facilitate weight loss by reducing blood sugar and blunting the glycemic response.

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Kefirko Kefir Maker Australia

 


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4 comments

  • Kriben Govender

    Dec 08, 2017

    Hi Lois water kefir is equally as beneficial as it contains lots of probiotics too
    Hi Anna yes our community are seeing very good result with kefir consumption

  • Lois

    Nov 13, 2017

    You never seem to say what goodness is in Water kefir have been brewing

    I never hear much said about water kefir. I am lead to believe it is very good and have been making it for

  • Anna

    Nov 13, 2017

    Interest read. I am just starting my kerfir journey and would love to see results in both my type 2 diabetes and weightloss. It would also be of value to see improvement in symptoms of menopause.

  • Anna

    Nov 13, 2017

    Interest read. I am just starting my kerfir journey and would love to see results in both my type 2 diabetes and weightloss. It would also be of value to see improvement in symptoms of menopause.


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